Skip to main content

Movie Review: The Quiet Ones (2014)

Plot synopsis: A university professor (Jared Harris) and a team
of his students (Sam Clafin, Erin Richards) conduct an experiment
on a young woman (Olivia Cooke), uncovering
terrifyingly dark and unexpected forces in the process.
_________________________________________________
 Lionsgate
Runtime: 1 hour, 38 minutes
Rated: PG-13 (for intense sequences of violence
and terror, sexual content, thematic material,
language, and smoking throughout)
Director: John Pogue
Writers: Craig Rosenberg, Oren Moverman
Starring: Jared Harris, Sam Claflin, Olivia Cooke
Horror
Despite its throat-scraping screams of terror, The Quiet Ones is absolutely mute when it comes to contributing to the horror genre in any meaningful way.

An experiment involving students at Oxford in 1974 leads a skeptical few to realizing that the force they seek to reduce to terms most familiar is far more sinister and deadly than they can imagine.

Wanna know what I can't imagine? Why a film with such fine and devoted acting can't do anything but occupy space as another "show up the skeptics" piece of cinema where the supernatural elements are over-utilized and where sudden shocks and cheap "jump" surprises typical of possession-style horrors unjustly dominate the screenplay.

It is one of the most well acted horrors in a long time, with Cooke as a perfect pick for her part, but it manages to throw out its nicely stirred pot of ingredients – with plenty of soft, erotic elements put in – and let it dissolve into another "mysterious cult / unknown demon" eye-roller.

The potential here was nothing short of amazing, the dimensional nuances so acutely honed, and yet it fast became just another lesson in how the scariest things in a movie are the things we don't see, the things we are made to guess and wonder about, rather than bizarre levitations or strange ancient markings. We've had enough of the latter.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

When Jesus Turns Down the Glory: 10 Worst Ever Christian Songs

It’s a sad testimony when even the creator of a thing realizes that the product isn’t what it was intended to be. Well, actually it’s a good thing. It just doesn’t happen often enough. The Christian music industry is, shall we say, not up to par with where its admirers (and even creators and ardent well-wishers) would hope it would be. And when even the average believer realizes that their music is not market-cornering stuff, all should know that there is a problem.

Now not all Christian music sucks (you might even find a few rock songs from artists like Petra on Joe Holman’s ipod that he still sometimes listens to and enjoys), but what makes the stuff that does suck suck is that what sucks sucks for a number of different reasons. We begin the countdown going from best of the worst to absolute worst...

Movie Review: The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

When free spirit “Jules” (Anna “Go Girls” Hutchison) tells her best friend “Dana” (Kristen “Revolutionary Road” Connolly) what a good time they’ll be having at a cabin in the remote woods, you automatically know and are glad that she has no idea at all what awaits her or her friends, and neither does Jules’ jock boyfriend “Curt” (Chris “Thor” Hemsworth). The same is true of their intellectual friend with his notably piercing gaze, “Holden” (Jesse “Grey’s Anatomy” Williams) and their stoner friend “Marty” (Franz “The Village” Kranz) who seems to have a better grasp of reality, despite himself. Takes all kinds.

After taking off in the RV up the mountain, they stop for gas and run into a weirdly cryptic and confrontational gas station attendant (Tim De Zarn). When they’re back on the road after a near-fight, it isn’t long before they arrive and forget all about it. Following horror movie suit in letting out their whoas about how cool the place is and how much fun they will have losing t…

Movie Review: Django Unchained (2012)

At about 3 hours long, Django Unchained is Quentin Tarantino’s latest mental sickness-inspired adventure of a slave named “Django” (Jamie Foxx) who is freed by a German dentist-turned-bounty hunter, “Dr. King Schultz” (Christoph Waltz) who helps Django rescue his enslaved wife from a cruel plantation owner (Leonardo DiCaprio) in Mississippi.