Skip to main content

Movie Review: Deliver Us From Evil (2014)

Plot synopsis: NY police officer Ralph Sarchie
(Eric Bana) investigates a series of crimes. He
joins forces with an unconventional priest, schooled
in the rituals of exorcism (Édgar Ramírez), to combat
the possessions that are terrorizing their city.
________________________________________________
 Runtime: 1 hour, 58 minutes
Rated: R (for bloody violence, grisly images, terror throughout,
and language)
 Director: Scott Derrickson
Starring: Eric Bana, Édgar Ramírez, Olivia Munn
Crime | Horror | Thriller
Director Scott Derrickson (Sinister, The Possession of Emily Rose) brings us Deliver Us From Evil, a crude-but-biblically titled horror that feels more like an apologetic video for a fundamentalist Catholic evangelistic effort aimed at lapsed, on-the-fence Catholics in New York as opposed to moviegoers at large.

And while Eric Bana (Hulk, Vantage Point) and Édgar Ramírez (The Bourne Ultimatum) work great together, the writing behind who they are and what they are doing is left hanging in a wishy-washy, unoriginal patchwork of a film that is neither interesting, nor scary.

Ralph's beautiful wife (Olivia Munn) is neglected, as is his daughter (Lulu Wilson). The situation at home is only one more reason why theses events, and the events of the film as a whole, are not hard to see coming.

Beyond the tendency to be effectively creepy through distant facial expressions and stare-downs, the only real scare that is memorable is seen in the trailer, as a stuffed animal falls off of a shelf and rolls forward to face Ralph's little girl. Only standard-fare horror entertainment (flash-in/flash-out images of tormented souls and super-strong possession victims, grayed corpses, etc.) follows this.

Joel McHale, as Ralph's partner, did nothing for the story. The inclusion of only a few small surprises or emotional moments throughout just make us want more (but then never deliver on them).

The possession angle is pretty well safely called a dead-end genre at this point. Everything that can be done has been done. If this doesn't prove it, I don't know what does!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

When Jesus Turns Down the Glory: 10 Worst Ever Christian Songs

It’s a sad testimony when even the creator of a thing realizes that the product isn’t what it was intended to be. Well, actually it’s a good thing. It just doesn’t happen often enough. The Christian music industry is, shall we say, not up to par with where its admirers (and even creators and ardent well-wishers) would hope it would be. And when even the average believer realizes that their music is not market-cornering stuff, all should know that there is a problem.

Now not all Christian music sucks (you might even find a few rock songs from artists like Petra on Joe Holman’s ipod that he still sometimes listens to and enjoys), but what makes the stuff that does suck suck is that what sucks sucks for a number of different reasons. We begin the countdown going from best of the worst to absolute worst...

Movie Review: Django Unchained (2012)

At about 3 hours long, Django Unchained is Quentin Tarantino’s latest mental sickness-inspired adventure of a slave named “Django” (Jamie Foxx) who is freed by a German dentist-turned-bounty hunter, “Dr. King Schultz” (Christoph Waltz) who helps Django rescue his enslaved wife from a cruel plantation owner (Leonardo DiCaprio) in Mississippi.

Movie Review: The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

When free spirit “Jules” (Anna “Go Girls” Hutchison) tells her best friend “Dana” (Kristen “Revolutionary Road” Connolly) what a good time they’ll be having at a cabin in the remote woods, you automatically know and are glad that she has no idea at all what awaits her or her friends, and neither does Jules’ jock boyfriend “Curt” (Chris “Thor” Hemsworth). The same is true of their intellectual friend with his notably piercing gaze, “Holden” (Jesse “Grey’s Anatomy” Williams) and their stoner friend “Marty” (Franz “The Village” Kranz) who seems to have a better grasp of reality, despite himself. Takes all kinds.

After taking off in the RV up the mountain, they stop for gas and run into a weirdly cryptic and confrontational gas station attendant (Tim De Zarn). When they’re back on the road after a near-fight, it isn’t long before they arrive and forget all about it. Following horror movie suit in letting out their whoas about how cool the place is and how much fun they will have losing t…