Skip to main content

What Did You Expect?

Movie Review: Scream 4 (2011)
Summary: Sidney Prescott is visited again by the Ghostface Killer.
Spoilers: none 

Scream 4 begins with “Sidney Prescott” (Neve Campbell) who, after ten years of doing well for herself writing self-help books, comes home to Woodsboro for the last stop of her book tour. Touching base with “Sheriff Dewey” (David Arquette) and “Gale” (Courtney Cox) who are now married, she finds her cousin, “Jill” (Emma Roberts) and “Aunt Kate” (Mary McDonnell).
   
But it is the return of Ghostface that will put Sidney and her entire town in peril. Directed by Wes Craven, it should be a surprise to no one that Scream 4 follows suit in being a relentless philosophical parody of horror movies that many viewers will come in expecting. But if you haven’t seen the previous 3 movies and don’t know what to expect, don’t expect much.

This pointless picture simply doesn’t need to exist, and despite being well-acted and ably put together, loses all interest before 10 minutes in with its heavily worn and played-upon self-deprecating horror movie trivia, bizarre screams, and psycho-masked killer routines.  By 12-minutes in, the audience is still being subjected to talk about horror movies and getting prank calls.

There are some cheap thrills here to go with some clever story development, but it’s the sadistically intelligent dialog and script that make it just watch-able for those interested. This is all for naught, however, as the movie is essentially a purposeless exercise and a ridiculous thrill in reminiscence of the last film some thirteen years back.

But if you were a fan of the earlier Scream movies, you’ll for sure like this one. Two stars for the underpowered and unwanted (and for me, profoundly boring) Scream 4.

(JH)

Grade:
C- (2 stars)
Rated:
R (for strong bloody violence, language, and some teen drinking)
Director:
Wes Craven
Starring:
“The Voice” (voice) (Roger Jackson), “Sherrie” (Lucy Hale), “Trudie” (Shenae Grimes), “Ghostface” (Dane Farwell), “Rachel” (Anna Paquin), “Chloe” (Kristen Bell), “Sidney Prescott” (Neve Campbell), “Rebecca Walters” (Alison Brie), “Dewey Riley” (David Arquette), “Gale Weathers-Riley” (Courteney Cox) 
Genre: Horror / Mystery / Thriller
Trailer

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

When Jesus Turns Down the Glory: 10 Worst Ever Christian Songs

It’s a sad testimony when even the creator of a thing realizes that the product isn’t what it was intended to be. Well, actually it’s a good thing. It just doesn’t happen often enough. The Christian music industry is, shall we say, not up to par with where its admirers (and even creators and ardent well-wishers) would hope it would be. And when even the average believer realizes that their music is not market-cornering stuff, all should know that there is a problem.

Now not all Christian music sucks (you might even find a few rock songs from artists like Petra on Joe Holman’s ipod that he still sometimes listens to and enjoys), but what makes the stuff that does suck suck is that what sucks sucks for a number of different reasons. We begin the countdown going from best of the worst to absolute worst...

The Top 5 Most Powerful Beings in Sci-fi (Part I of II)

It’s a subject that is rarely tackled in any form outside of random questions on a message board, but here we will devote a sensible examination of it. Who – what – is the most powerful being anywhere in every realm of sci-fi or fantasy ever dreamt up by a finite human being? I’ve been contemplating this subject since I was 8 years old. At 39, it hasn’t left my mind. That means several things; (1) I’m a fucking geek. (2) I’ve invested enough of my life pondering this for it to qualify as an obsession.

As with all “Most” anything lists, we are faced with several problems, one of them being limited source material. A couple of these only made one or two brief appearances somewhere and that is all we have to go by. But sometimes, those situations let our imaginations go into overdrive and give us even more creative fun. The mystery tends to add to the experience of contemplation.

Movie Review: Blair Witch (2016)